Friday, October 14, 2011

Black "Occupiers" In Philly Are Called "Ninjas" By White "Occupiers" - Incident Missing On Various Black Progressive Syndication Sources

Black Activist Points Out Occupy Philly’s Racial Disconnect

Unlike operatives like Oliver Willis - I have no intention of playing "Gotcha" with the news that several Black participants in the "Occupy Philadelphia" were called "Ninjas" by white participants in the rally.


From City Paper

Arturo Castillon, found sitting atop a concrete buttress with a White Allies Committee sign, told CP that he had personally witnessed the incident in question, though his story poses not a few questions about what actually happened.
"I was with two of my friends, two black women, and we were talking shit on white people," says Castillon, who is white. "These two guys got really offended and they started calling these black women 'nigger' ... because in their mind, it's the same thing to talk shit on white people as on black people." Castillon claims he then punched one of the offending men in the face. CP was not able to verify any of these details.
Before tonight's meeting, the People of Color Committee could be seen talking near Dilworth Plaza's Southwest corner. Whites approaching the group were asked — politely, though bluntly — by one member whether they "identified as people of color." If not, they were asked to step back.
That person, a 23-year-old man who goes by the name The Voice, spoke to CP afterward. "We felt like the minorities were not ... I hate to say this, but it felt like it was an all-white movement at first," he said. "We felt like the minorities in this group were not being well-represented and so we decided to start a working group."
"A bunch of white members stood up against what we [the People of Color Working Group] were talking about, he added. "They tried to preach this one-ness. ... These issues just started affecting white middle-class people. They have always affected the black community."
That said, The Voice emphasized not division but unity of purpose: "We're not divided," he said. "I repeat: This movement is not divided. We just have our own agendas. You're probably not going to put this in the paper, but the media is looking for us to divide ourselves — especially sleazy papers like City Paper and thePhiladelphia Weekly [after instinctively raising an eyebrow, The Voice added, 'any group that puts pornography numbers on the back of their papers.']. They look for division, but we're not here to divide the movement. We're here so our voice can be heard."






According to the blog, complex-brown:
“Saturday, two sisters were called Niggers by two of the volunteers at Occupy Philadelphia at the cell-phone charging stations. They were also told to go back to Africa, and that each white man should own a slave. When the sista’s called security, security asked them to leave the premises because they thought they were apart of the UHURU movement. Even if they were a part of that movement, they should not have been asked to leave. Especially without any mention of their verbal and spiritual abuse. So a small collective formed a drummer’s circle on Sunday and started a rally, only to be met with on-lookers who didn’t understand why there was a Pan-African flag at an “American” event. We were called racist…When we circled up to come up with a constructive way to address the people, we were constantly interrupted by white people who could not respect our safe space. These people said that it was a public space, and we couldn’t have a group that exc[l]uded them. Why is it when black people want to get together to work out our issues in our community we are called out? …We spoke out about RACISM IN THE 99 percent.”

For me it is understood - there are dumb-azzes in every movement.
The primary means of appraising the character of a movement is how much they demand that those who wear their banner live up to a certain standard.

In any event - don't expect to see the NAACP join with "People For The American Way" to release a web site "The Occupier Watch"

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